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Boy Chief

A Warriors Story

As told by Floyd Royal, heir, surviving grandson, grandfather and father:

 

          It was in the cold of an autumn hunt in the flats of the Montana plane were the Missouri river flowed cold that a party of Blackfoot warriors ventured knowing full well that they were now entering Sioux country, the famed warriors of Sitting Bull himself, but meat was scarce, there was little choice but to press on into Sioux territory.

 

            A herd of buffalo was soon found and chase gave way as the heard was driven over a cliff, finally meat was of abundance. The warriors celebrated and quickly the women were brought in to start the skinning process, but as quickly as the celebration began Blackfoot scouts rushed in galloping at full speed warning the others of an eminent Sioux war party heading in their direction. Just then the sounds of rifle rounds began to pelt the ground where the Blackfoot party was, confusion ensued as burst after burst of enemy fire and return fire began, in the far off distance a lone Blackfoot woman could be seen scrambling for cover as certain death was approaching her, just then a young 13 year old boy scrambled atop a horse and brought the beast up to full gallop, charging in the direction of the lone woman, he rode fast and hard as round after round of rifle bullets peppered his vicinity, determined to save the woman, the young lad was grazed by a rifle burst yet he was undaunted and determined he reached the lone woman and singlehandedly scooping her up onto the back of the horse then grabbing the reigns with power he turned the horse and charged through the Sioux warriors who were closing in on his position, in the dirt and dust, the screaming, the war cries, the confusion of battle, he charged his stead through the maddening chaos, through the rifle rounds of death and brought that lone woman to safety. That young lad who courageously charged through the Sioux war party would turn out to be Boy Chief, and that lone woman that he saved, would turn out to be his mother.

 

            There exists in infamy many battles and skirmishes where Boy Chief displayed great heroism, and just as many moments where he displayed great compassion. Boy Chief, would become a respected leader, be renowned for the raising of the finest steads, over 2000 of them at one point and owned one of the largest ranches in southern Alberta. People from all over would seek out Boy Chief for his advice and care as he was also a highly regarded, medicine man. He was also a famed participant in the Calgary Stampede, he was by non-native standards to be considered the highest of aristocrats as his wealth was measured through acres of land and the amount of horses he had. He was considered more than just a warrior and a recognized statesmen he was often thought of as a shrewd businessman also.

 

            At the age of 81, Boy Chief passed away. His legacy lives through the stories and legends that have been passed on by those that knew him, those that have heard firsthand the accounts of his adventures.